Jjm Hoogervorst For Anvia Piano Desk Lamp

SOLD

Jjm Hoogervorst For Anvia Piano Desk Lamp

SOLD

Estimated delivery

£29 to mainland UK

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A small and perfectly formed desk lamp, from the master of Dutch lighting, JJM Hoogervorst. For ANVIA.

ANVIA was founded in Berlin in the early 30’s by Max Liebert but moved to Almelo (a Dutch town near the border of Germany) before the start of the war as Liebert was Jewish. The acronym stands for ‘Algemene Nederlandse Verlichtings Industrie Almelo’ which translates as General Dutch Lighting Industry Almelo. Jan Hoogervorst was the principle designer during the 50s and 60s and designed the majority of ANVIA’s collection. Inspired by the Italian lighting designers of the period – Gino Sarfatti etc – he did away with opulence of Italian design and was heavily influenced by the geometric reduction of the De Stijl movement and no frills Calvinism. The form was often reduced to a most simple expression of its function, using straight lines, perfect circles and monochrome colouring.

The Piano lamp is such an exercise in sober functionalism and minimal engineering. The stem articulates to any height, balanced on a counterweight, while the neat cylindrical shade turns, so the light can be directed to the task. It is nicknamed ‘piano’ lamp, because it can be articulated over the top of a piano to illuminate the keys without losing its balance.

Other: N/A

Inner London: £20
Outer London: £40

For all other UK addresses, please send a message with your postcode to [email protected] for an accurate delivery quote or use the 'Ask a question about this item' button.

This item will be shipped from London, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland.
If you want to save on delivery costs, this item is available for collection.
We offer a 14-day return policy. Please check our conditions.

Wear Condition: Good

Designer: JJM Hoogervorst

Brand/Manufacturer: ANVIA

Date of Manufacture: 1950s

Place of Origin: Netherlands

Period: Mid 20th Century

Style: Industrial

Listed by: Sophie_f6f6

This seller is VAT registered.

SKU: 97516580

A small and perfectly formed desk lamp, from the master of Dutch lighting, JJM Hoogervorst. For ANVIA.

ANVIA was founded in Berlin in the early 30’s by Max Liebert but moved to Almelo (a Dutch town near the border of Germany) before the start of the war as Liebert was Jewish. The acronym stands for ‘Algemene Nederlandse Verlichtings Industrie Almelo’ which translates as General Dutch Lighting Industry Almelo. Jan Hoogervorst was the principle designer during the 50s and 60s and designed the majority of ANVIA’s collection. Inspired by the Italian lighting designers of the period – Gino Sarfatti etc – he did away with opulence of Italian design and was heavily influenced by the geometric reduction of the De Stijl movement and no frills Calvinism. The form was often reduced to a most simple expression of its function, using straight lines, perfect circles and monochrome colouring.

The Piano lamp is such an exercise in sober functionalism and minimal engineering. The stem articulates to any height, balanced on a counterweight, while the neat cylindrical shade turns, so the light can be directed to the task. It is nicknamed ‘piano’ lamp, because it can be articulated over the top of a piano to illuminate the keys without losing its balance.

Other: N/A

Inner London: £20
Outer London: £40

For all other UK addresses, please send a message with your postcode to [email protected] for an accurate delivery quote or use the 'Ask a question about this item' button.

This item will be shipped from London, United Kingdom.
If you want to save on delivery costs, this item is available for collection.
We offer a 14-day return policy. Please check our conditions.

Wear Condition: Good

Designer: JJM Hoogervorst

Brand/Manufacturer: ANVIA

Date of Manufacture: 1950s

Place of Origin: Netherlands

Period: Mid 20th Century

Style: Industrial

Listed by: Sophie_f6f6

This seller is VAT registered.