Tripod Light

Tripod Light

Tripod Light

£425.00
Seller rating 3 seller reviews
Service fee
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£12.75
Delivery fee for 
£29.00*
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Delivering from
Bristol , United Kingdom
Collection
Collection available ✓

The above information is an estimate only, and is based upon front-door delivery. Final rates vary by destination and complexity. To get an accurate delivery quote suited to your needs, please request a quote

About this item

Early 20th Century industrial medical lamp light, with fish eye convex lens and adjustable form, stamped with impressed makers mark, Allen and Hanbury’s of London.The tripod with makers Kern of Switzerland embossed to central steel band, has the most fantastic look. then comes the decades of patination sealed into the elegant oak legs which,taper down to its stylishly engineered steel feet. These two great pieces of design have been sympathetically blended together to form a piece of functional furniture that you can guarantee no one else will have. This will work equally well at home as it would in an art gallery, as personally I think the design feature of this light was to aim it specifically onto another piece, such as a piece of wall art as it forms the perfect adjustable circle, onto the object intended. Please note this lamp was not designed to light up a whole room as described above. Rewired in antique gold braided flex, then PAT tested by “Fingers” the electrician.

Additional dimensions information:

Height Minimum: 102 cm

Dimensions

H168.0 cm

Condition

Used

Wear condition

Good

Date of manufacture

Unknown

Place of origin

Switzerland

Period

Early 20th Century

Seller

VAT status

Seller is not VAT registered

SKU

87954078
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