Antique Pair Victorian Plated Adam Style Candelabra C.1860

Antique Pair Victorian Plated Adam Style Candelabra C.1860

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About this item

This is a stunning pair of antique Victorian Adam style silver plated, two light, table candelabra bearing the makers mark of the renowned silversmith Hawksworth, Eyre & Co, Circa 1860 in date. This mark was used by Hawksworth Eyre from 1850 to 1873.

The candelabra feature detachable campana sconces and have beautiful cast decoration in the Adam style, of urns, ribbons, bows, garlands, etc.

The attention to detail is absolutely fantastic and they are certain to attract attention wherever they are placed.

Condition:

In excellent condition with clear makers marks and no dings, dents or signs of repair. Please see photos for confirmation.

Dimensions in cm:

Height 48 x Width 46 x Depth 15

Dimensions in inches:

Height 1 foot, 7 inches x Width 1 foot, 6 inches x Depth 6 inches

Hawksworth, Eyre & Co
was founded in 1833 by Charles Hawksworth and John Eyre as successors of Blagden, Hodgson & Co. The first mark was registred in 1862. They were manufacturers and silversmith of silver and silver plated objects.

The partnership was dissolved in 1869 and the business was continued by James Kebberling Bembridge, Thomas Hall and George Woofhouse. In the 1870s the firm was converted into a limited liability company under the style Hawksworth, Eyre & Co Ltd. Further marks were registered in 1900 & 1912. The firm went into liquidation in the 1930s.

Dimensions

W46.0 x H48.0 x D15.0 cm

Condition

Used

Wear condition

Excellent

Date of manufacture

Unknown

Period

19th Century

Style

Antique

Seller

VAT status

Seller is VAT registered

SKU

52978449
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