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The best of Czech design: Feast your eyes on chairs by Jindřich Halabala and Antonín Šuman

Czech chair designs from the 20th century are currently among the highest in demand. Celebrated designers such as Antonín Šuman and Jindřich Halabala are being sought by designers across the world. We wanted to bring the best of their work directly to your door. Enjoy this selection below and enjoy browsing the full collection!

A treasure trove of maximalist wallpapers on Vinterior.

Whether on one wall or all of them, finding an eye catching wallpaper can be a hugely rewarding design choice. Some are bold and vibrant, others are more whimsical with dainty colours. Dare to be brave this Spring and find a print which makes your soul sing!

Spring Inspiration for Maximalist Interiors

While the first signs of spring are beginning to emerge, showering us with colour, fresh air and lovely scents of seasonal flowers, we cannot but notice that our interiors too are coming out of hibernation. After a long Scandinavian winter when minimalist, pared-back interiors reigned supreme, we are slowly but firmly waking up to a season of opulence and creativity in interior design.

Our Favourite Vintage Leather Finds on Vinterior

Leather is a brilliant material to use on furniture in the home. Not only does it withstand the wear and tear of everyday life – you need have no fear of upending even red wine on real leather – it weathers beautifully over the years, lending character which just can’t be found in mass made furniture.

Meet the Designer: Hans Wegner

Hans Wegner is one of Denmark’s most famous designers. Whether you’ve heard his name before or not, you’ll definitely recognise his iconic designs. We love knowing about the humans behind these celebrated feats of design… here is your quick fire guide to Hans Wegner!

Get the Look: Mid Century Modern Dining Room

We recently asked what was your favourite look and you went for the Boho Leafy Living Room. However, it was a very tight call as this beautifully balanced Mid Century Modern dining room lost by just a couple of votes. After receiving so much love, we felt it was only natural to feature this room too and help you recreate the look in your own home.

Green Vintage Sofas You’ll Fall in Love With

Green is probably a colour we’re all hankering after right now. Winter draws to a close and Spring is on the way! Green is a wonderful colour to use in the home through every season. In the cooler months, green velvet on sofas and chairs reflects the rich glowing jewel tones we see during the Autumn. In Spring and Summer, its natural vibrancy helps us to bring a sense of the outdoors in. Green is both calming and invigorating… as humans we’re programmed to need it! Green sofas have a been a brilliant way to add a stylish splash of colour… here is a selection of our favourites on Vinterior.

Top tips: finding the perfect vintage rug for your home

vintage rug antique rug for sale tradition

The right rug will elevate the room and tie all the pieces together in a unified look while opening up the space to fun and comfort. To help you make an educated choice, we broke down the process into small, easy-to-grasp actions that will safely guide you from complete overwhelmment to great satisfaction.

Here are our top five tips for choosing the perfect rug for your space!

Do we live in throwaway homes and can we avoid this? Amanda Jones has an ‘Exit Strategy’ and some great advice.

Amanda Jones is the human behind the popular Instagram account @small_sustainable_steps. Known for her honest and helpful posts across a wide host of topics, from living with MS to fighting a culture of excess and waste within her home, Amanda’s social following has gathered serious speed. In an age of microwave consumerism, and the subsequent throwaway culture which can arise from this, our curiosity was piqued by Amanda’s smart approach to curating her home and what finds a place in it. Her recent ‘Exit Strategy’ – by which we refer to the removal of anything deemed to be excess – resonated with many of Amanda’s followers. Enjoy this candid chat with her about all things interiors and creating a home which breathes.

How did you become interested in interiors?

I first became interested in interiors at the grand old age of 10. I was moving into my own bedroom for the first time, and my Mum gave me carte blanche on how I wanted my room decorating. It was the smallest bedroom in the house… I chose a dark brown wallpaper with small sprigs of peach flowers printed on it. Very 1970s. I could tell my Mum thought it would be too much, but I loved it. I went away for a week with my friend’s family, and when I got back my bedroom was done. I loved it, and I’ve been hooked on interior design ever since. The chest of drawers I had in my bedroom belonged to my grandparents. I still have it now in my living room. So I’m not only hooked on interiors, but also secondhand furniture. 

How would you describe your home?

My home is an eclectic mix of vintage and new pieces. Everything I have in my home has some meaning to me, my family, or some practical use. It is colourful and calm. Whilst I might have a minimal mindset now, and my home is very pared down to what it was, I don’t think I’m what you might typically see as minimalist. There’s no monochrome or clean lines. It’s all about being comfortable, about not being too precious. When people visit, I want them to feel relaxed and welcome.

What concerns you about buying patterns today, particularly for home design?

I am particularly concerned about the growing trend of fast interiors. We are being encouraged to replace furniture or decor on a regular basis. If we’re not careful, the interior industry will go the same way as fast fashion. This throwaway mindset means we aren’t really giving any value items we are bringing into our home. Mass produced furniture and decor can be bought so cheaply now, and therefore easy to dispose of. This is a worrying trend, not only for the planet, but also for our pockets.

Can you tell us about your recent ‘Exit Strategy’?

My Exit Strategy is something I devised when I started to declutter. These are some tips to make the process of letting ‘stuff’ go as easy as possible:

  1. Decide where that item will go. It could be to a charity, a local group, a friend, or sell something. This actually makes letting go easier, especially as you know that someone else will benefit.
  2. Have a holding place, out of the way, where donated items can be stored. That way you’re not tripping over bags and boxes. Ideally get items out of your house as soon as possible because then you are less tempted to pull things out again. When decluttering it is important to get a sense of the space you’re creating, this gives you motivation to do more. It’s your reward, so to speak. If you have bags and boxes piled up, it’s difficult to see your progress.
  3. Set a date to remove these items, and do it.
  4. Now I’m living a low waste lifestyle, I’ve developed another point. Before I bring anything new into my house, I ask where that item will go when I no longer require it. Is it something someone else will want, is it recyclable? I try and avoid items that will only end in landfill. This has made me more mindful of my purchases, and really question if I genuinely need something.

What is the first thing you approach when renovating a room?

When I’m designing a room, I first think about how I will use the room, and just as importantly, how I want the room to feel. I might then choose an item of furniture, or a decorative piece, and pull the look together from there. I never rush a room, I like it to evolve over time. I’m a firm believer that a piece of furniture will find its way to you, even if you have to wait a while. I always have a mental list of things I’m on the hunt for, and keep my eyes peeled when I’m out and about.

What do you most value in sourcing second-hand/vintage furniture?

When I’m buying secondhand furniture, I really value the history of the piece. I love finding things that are unique, things that have been made to a high standard. I always look for something a little bit different, and when I do eventually find what I’m looking for, it’s a bit like you’ve hit the jackpot.

Which aspect of your home do you enjoy the most and why?

The aspect I love most about my home is the view over the garden. It was originally why we bought this house. We are in a slightly elevated position, with views over our neighbourhood. Even though we are in a town, it feels more like the countryside. We recently updated our old conservatory, adding a large gable end window and solid roof, which means we can appreciate the view all year round now. It’s a really lovely, calm space to sit.

Do you have any renovation projects in the pipeline?

Updating our conservatory was the first phase of renovations, and we still have more to do. I have MS, and we are looking to ‘future proof’ our home, should my needs change. We will be changing the layout of our downstairs, so we can add a bathroom, without extending. This will mean moving our kitchen into the dining room/conservatory space. We want to keep the look of the new space as simple as possible, to feel light and airy. We are going to have to make a relatively small space, work very hard.

What are your top three tips to those who are thinking about sustainable consumerism for home design?

If I were to pass on three tips for sustainable home interiors it would be: 
 
  1. Think before you buy, is it something you really need? What will it bring to the quality of your life, is it something that you will have for many years, or is it just an impulse buy?
  2. Don’t bow to trends. Know what you love, and stick to that. I’ve had a similar look to my home for 30 years, I’m confident in the look and feel I want in my home.
  3. Buy secondhand if you can. It’s not always possible but the more we stop the demand for new, the healthier our planet will be.  

Do you feel inspired by Amanda’s approach to sustainable home design? Let us know in the comment section! If you would like to find unique and built to last vintage furniture, enjoy browsing the Vinterior collection here.  

Don’t forget to follow @small_sustainable_steps to hear more from Amanda about living a life with less waste and much more besides!

The Return of Folk to Interior Design

 

For a while now, the central focus of interior inspiration has fallen primarily within the realm of Mid Century and Postmodern design. Whilst we continue to appreciate the merits of this aesthetic, we believe it shouldn’t hinder the discovery of other rich and characterful design genres. The annals of design history are coloured not just by formal design movements but also, as Vinterior seller Kitty Walsh puts it, by the popular culture of the past: the things which ordinary people themselves liked to make and do. This is what we call ‘folk’ and an immensely rich area of design which deserves to be placed back under the limelight.

Vinterior is immensely proud of our collaboration with many of the leading vintage and antique furniture specialists in the UK and beyond. After all, our mission is to seek out the remarkable and to shine the spotlight on people, places and pieces with real character, real soul and real stories. Behind the exceptional pieces on Vinterior stand some equally brilliant and highly knowledgeable collectors, who bring life to the stories behind the furniture you buy.

This week, I’m speaking to folk expert Kitty Walsh. As the founder of London gallery and collection Modern Folk, Kitty is bringing fresh attention to folk design, a genre richly woven with vibrant colours, patterns and the echo of many lives lived. We are inspired by the joyful union of colour and print which adorns so many of the pieces in the Modern Folk collection and the instant character which they lend to a space.

But what actually is folk design?

As Kitty explains, ‘Folk culture simply means the popular culture of the past, the things ordinary people liked to sing, eat, drink, make, and do. Folk art is the material part of this culture – from the clothes people wore, to the homes that they lived in, and the tools that they used to work. Just as favourite recipes and songs were passed down from century to century, so were the methods of making particular types of clothing or objects. As each generation added to the knowledge of their forefathers, rich cultural traditions gradually emerged.’

Kitty travels across vast regions of Eastern Europe and Scandinavia in pursuit of finding folk treasures. Most recently she travelled to Transylvania, unearthing rare finds at Negreni, an ancient Romani market in the Carpathian mountains. I asked Kitty about the origins of her interest in folk and what makes it stand out from other vintage genres.

How did you become passionate about collecting the folk genre?

I’ve always been drawn to folk art – I began collecting Norwegian knitwear and folk slippers as a teenager and I used to make piñatas for extra pocket money. Then when I was studying History of Art at Cambridge I found a book on Hungarian folk art in a charity shop and was really hooked.

Why folk in particular?

With the folk genre you get to see the crafts person’s process – it’s great to see how people all over the world have responded to a particular design problem. Plus, I’m a bit of a maximalist so I love the patterns and colour!

What makes folk stand out from other vintage genres?

The stories attached to the pieces – you get such a strong sense of their history. These are pieces from a much simpler time – people had far fewer items in their home and most of them would have been made by people in their immediate community. This furniture marked important moments, when they got married or had their first child, it’s really a record of their lives.

Do you have any interesting stories behind the pieces currently in your collection?

A great example is our beautiful painted wedding chest, dated June 1891. It would have been used to carry the bride’s – Kata’s – possessions to her new home. But you get the same sense of history with the more minimal pieces, like a so-called bachelor’s table covered with knife marks.

Which is your favourite piece and why?

It has to be the ‘fancy country’ wardrobe – it’s so full of life! It was made in Transylvania in the mid twentieth century and is covered with flowers, fruits and birds. I’d love to know if the painter was thinking of William Morris’ strawberry thief when he painted the cheeky birds.

Kitty’s Modern Folk collection is bursting with folk curiosities, from intricately patterned chairs to simple carved wooden chests and vibrant glass paintings. I love the unique imperfections found in vintage and antique furniture for their ability to spark conversation and how they speak of crafts loved, lives lived and memories lost. What I find particularly special about folk furniture is that each piece is created with such purpose and to provide a sense of place. We can keep these exceptional pieces of furniture alive by bringing them into our homes so that our own unique family stories become woven around them.

View the Modern Folk collection here.

 

Portrait of Kitty taken from Wharf Magazine.