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These 2019 lighting trends are going to be everywhere!

This year already is producing a wonderful variety of lighting trends. They simmered quietly throughout 2018 and now we are seeing them grace many of our homes. We love that these lighting trends are so diverse! From classical, simple lighting to maximalist brass pendants, there really is something for all tastes and inspirations. Here are four top trends you’ll be seeing plenty of in 2019…

Get to know iconic designer Arne Jacobsen in 8 quick facts.

He’s one of Denmark’s most celebrated designers and still influences so much of contemporary design. But who actually is Arne Jacobsen and what is he so famous for? Here are some quick facts to put him on your map!

  1. From a young age, it was clear that Arne had creative talent. He originally wanted to be a painter but his father felt that architecture was a more practical pursuit.

2. Arne travelled all around the world to expand his creative horizons. He made the voyage to New York as a sailor and spent time as a bricklayer in Germany. Italy became somewhere Arne visited frequently to paint accurate, atmospheric watercolours.

3. Jacobsen’s career as an ultra-modern architect was boosted by winning some major awards: one of them was given by the Danish Architect’s Association for his ‘House of the Future’ design. The glass and concrete house was flat-roofed, spiral-shaped, had a conveyor tube for letters, windows that rolled down like those of cars, a helipad, and a boathouse.

4. People have rioted and protested against Jacobsen’s ultra-modern buildings. One incident was for Gammeltorv’s Stelling House, which prompted a newspaper to print that Jacobsen should be ‘banned from architecture for life.’

5. During World War II, Jacobsen was persecuted for his Jewish heritage. With some assistance from the Danish resistance, Jacobsen rowed a boat to Sweden in order to escape the Nazi persecution.

6. Jacobsen’s chair designs are particularly famous. The sleek curved contours of the Egg, Swan and Drop chairs were viewed as ultra modern and unlike much achieved in furniture design previously.

7. In everything he did, Jacobsen embodied the concept of Gesamtkunst, which means seeing everything as a work of art.

8. In Great Britain, he designed St. Catherine’s College, Oxford, which even involved landscaping the garden and designed details such as the silverware, china, chairs, lamps and door handles. He also chose the fish for the pond!

Arne Jacobsen’s design for St Catherine’s College, Oxford including the famous fish pond!
Image credit: ox.ac.uk

Want to browse through all of Arne Jacobsen’s famous designs? Click right here and enjoy!

Title image credit: propertydesign.pl

Meet the vintage dealer: clock collector Russell from London Timepiece.

Meet Russell, a vintage dealer of clocks! Russell’s wonderful studio is a real cabinet of curiosities, filled from top to bottom with historical clocks. He invited two Vinterior team members to visit and they had a brilliant time exploring the collection and chatting to Russell about life as a clock collector!

How did you end up doing what you do?

I simply found myself doing this. It came from many years of selling antiques and collectibles as far back as the early 80s. I had a stand in Brick Lane when it was only antiques and collectibles. Later I had a stand at Greenwich Antique Market. From these beginnings, I started to specialise in clocks, lighting and mechanical oddities.

Do you have a favourite designer/artist and why?

Paul Nash. Nothing whatsoever to do with clocks but a brilliant lifetime’s work in several media. To my eyes, quintessentially English.

What would be your dream vintage/antique find?

A Paul Nash.

This is a lovely piece. Nash was quite an important English surrealist and this piece epitomises the surrealist ideals with a wonderful sense of the English countryside.

Best piece you’ve ever sourced?

A massive double-sided English factory clock from the 1950s. It is now in Australia. 

Any interesting tales behind the pieces you collect?

Despite the obvious lies I’ve been told by many dealers, clock provenances are very difficult to provide. That said, I’ve sold a lot of items that were made and hung behind the iron curtain and many English clocks from railway stations.

What part of being a vintage clock dealer do you most enjoy?

Meeting customers. With my increased internet trading, I regret that this is becoming a rare privilege.

Can you describe your own home style in three words?

Practical, industrial, universal.

You have friends visiting. Where do you take them?

Proper pubs with good beer and without music.

Do you have a favourite vintage piece which you take wherever you go/had to keep for yourself?

I have a huge 1940s copper-cased wall clock made by International Time Recorders Ltd hanging in my kitchen.

What is the best thing about living/working in London?

There are people from all over the globe.

If your home was ablaze, what would you run back to save?

A massive collection I have of historical photos of my family that hangs along my hallway. I’d grab as many as possible.

And finally, what are you looking forward to in 2019?

Watching my daughter flourish.

Enjoy browsing through all of Russell’s vintage clocks here.

Home Tour: tech entrepreneur Sandrine invites us into her London home.

Meet Sandrine, the CEO of Vinterior! As the founder of the UK’s leading marketplace for vintage and antique furniture, it’s no wonder that her London home is also bursting with unique vintage finds. An eclectic mix of 20th century design – from Marcel Breuer’s sleek Wassily chair to the 70s Togo sofa – this home is filled with houseplants, artwork and a regal British Shorthair by the name of Misifu.

Marcel Breuer's sleek Wassily chair
Marcel Breuer’s Wassily lounge chair contrasts with the boho rattan rocking chair
Don’t mess with Misifu

Who lives here? I live here with Romain, my husband, and my sassy cat, Misifu.

Describe your home in three words! It’s eclectic, messy, and welcoming!

What first caught your eye about your home? The large open plan kitchen.

Favourite piece of furniture? My yellow easy chair by Poul Volther.

Best vintage find? My vintage Ligne Roset togo set is the most comfortable sofa in the world.

What makes for a great weekend in London? A hike in the near countryside with a nice pub lunch.

Who would make it into your dream squad? Reid Hoffman, founder of LinkedIn. I’ve learned a lot from his Master of Scale podcast series and his Blitz Scaling book.

vintage togo sofa
The dangerously comfortable Togo sofa
yellow poul volt her easy chair
This yellow Poul Volther easy chair inspired the founding of Vinterior!
large open plan kitchen
The panel featuring Sandrine’s best food moments
vintage retro brass drinks trolley

Room you love the most? My kitchen.

Top dinner party guests? Ray Dalio, Jeff Bezos and Reid Hoffman.

What would you all eat? Sea urchin sushi!

 Your home was ablaze, what do you run back to save? My phone!

Proud DIY moment? I made a huge panel with food photos I took.

Best entrepreneur quote? ‘If you’re not embarrassed by your first product, you’ve launched too late.’ – Reid Hoffman

Top tip for female business founders? Have more confidence in your own judgement and abilities, trust your guts.

Find all items linked below

Click on the links below to find these vintage pieces (from top to bottom):

  1. (After) Henri Matisse Vegetables
2. Franco Albini Rattan Coffee Table
3. Rattan Weave Lounge Chair
4. Cibele Plant Stand
5. Coffee Table In Teak By Finn Juhl
6. Dutch Mid Century Sofa
7. French Brass Trolley Circa 1940
8. Ligne Roset Togo Sofa
9. Black Leather Armchair Black By Marcel Breuer
10. Yellow Lounge Chair By Louis Van Teeffelen
11. Mid Century Modern Handcrafted Brass Bubbles Chandelier
12. Victorian White Marble Fireplace

Interior designer Celine talks tips on home renovations and what’s going to be big in 2019…

Celine is both a seasoned interior designer and the founder of interior design practice Indie&Co. A triumph of authentic yet understated interiors, Celine uses her design expertise to create homes which address the desire to lead a more balanced existence and encourage mindfulness within our spaces. She chatted to us about life as a designer and threw us some great tips for approaching any home renovation project.

Why did you become an interior designer?

I originally wanted to be a product designer but realised that whenever I wanted to design an object, I ended up designing the space around it.

Can you describe a typical project to us?

I mostly work on residential renovations from kitchen extensions to loft extensions to full refurbishment.

How would you describe your own home?

I am currently in the process of doing it up! We completed the loft extension and the renovation of the first floor this month and we are about to start the kitchen extension and ground floor renovation. I am designing my home around our needs and not around what the resale value would be which is freeing and makes it a functional space.

Home is everything to me, and this house is never empty. I have two small children, a dog, I work from home with my assistant when I am not onsite, I hold meetings in my house and my husband also has a home office which he uses at least one day a week. Usually on projects, we ended up with a fairly muted palette but this isn’t the case in my house. We used a lot of green from light to very moody, as well as some muted pinks and mustard yellows. The furniture is a mismatch of build-in joinery, vintage pieces and contemporary designers.

Where do you draw design inspiration from?

I find inspiration in the past, the colours, the layouts, the furniture and uses of it in a modern context. I also find restaurants and hotels a good place to find inspiration. 

What three words sum up life as an interior designer?

Unpredictable, flexible, exciting.

What is the first thing you tend to notice when walking into a new room?

The feel of the room is the first thing which hits me, so without realising I am thinking about: how the room smells, the temperature, is it nice to the touch, how the light makes me feel, what are the materials? I guess following this, the layout would probably be next.

Is there a design trend you would love to see make a comeback?

It is all about context, one item could fit perfectly in a space and feel totally relevant but look outdated in an other. I wouldn’t worry about trends, they always make a come back anyway. 

And one which history should forget?

Again this all depends on the context. I wouldn’t want to rule anything out but I guess that carpets in bathrooms would be one, avocado bathroom suits, the extensive use of plastic in interiors, PVC windows and the extensive use of down lights.

Top tip for somebody starting a new home project?

Hire a professional, it may seem expensive at the start – especially if you’ve never used an interior designer – but the investment is worth it. They will know how to avoid big costly mistakes and will allow you to actually deliver the dream home you originally wanted. They will have plenty of contacts which they can recommend and take a lot of the pressure off. A home renovation is a draining and at times very challenging process, so having someone there can make the whole difference. Also move out if you can afford it, the building stage always takes longer then originally anticipated and lastly put some money aside for the unexpected.

What’s a mistake which people often make when decorating?  

They look at each item individually rather than think about the whole picture.

Whose home would you love to sneak peak into?

I love all the homes on the site The Modern House.

Is there a dream piece you would like to find for your own home?

I am always on the look out for something a bit different. I have my eye on a few art pieces at the moment, and I also would love to find nice floor lights and table lights. 

What do you think will be big in 2019?

Wood kitchens, green kitchen, micro cement and micro concrete, sustainable and ethical products. 

Is there a film for which you would love to design the set?

I am a fan of Jean-Pierre Jeunet so any of his movies; I also love period dramas mostly for their sets and costumes.

And finally, what’s the best way to spend a weekend in London?

A long walk in the park followed by a pub lunch. 

Celine’s top three vintage items? Find them below and click through to view on the website. 

  1. Vintage Czechoslovak Folding Daybed, 1960s

For me this hits all the marks in terms of colour, texture and practicality, it is such a hard piece to find. Most of my clients are after a day/guest bed which looks beautiful.

2. ‘Caught In The Act’, Antique British Oil Painting C. 1800s

This is such a great painting, its both playful and timeless.

3. Swedish Gothic Revival Bookcase

A key piece in a kitchen or living space, this bookcase is elegant and understated.

Read more about Indie&Co here.

Hear from Chris as he travels the world unearthing remarkable vintage lighting.

It’s not everyday you meet someone who willingly arises at 4:30am to hunt down vintage lamps! Passionate about unearthing iconic designs, Chris founded Objects of Interest 20c to live out his dream of working as a collector and dealer of vintage pieces. He talked to us about the rise of ‘Early Ikea’, sourcing Mad Men lamps in Barcelona and where you should spend the weekend in London!

Why did you become a vintage collector and dealer?

I always bought and sold stuff.  When I was younger I bought a lot of old cameras and sold them on Brick Lane and over the Internet.  I realised that I could still do it as an adult and so I got an Anglepoise lamp. As with cameras, it enticed me to learn more about these items and suddenly I have a huge number of lamps and it has gone way too far!

The reason I started doing it as a business was because I could be my own boss. I worked in a job for a long time, but it was merely a job and not something I enjoyed. I’d rather be happy doing something everyday which brings me satisfaction.

Who is your favourite designer?

I really enjoy Bauhaus. It’s not a designer as such and more a field of design but Bauhaus inspires me very much. It was not just about designing furniture or architecture but it was about designing a new way of life.

What would be your dream vintage find?

I actually don’t know if I could answer that! There’s a thousand things on the list. I think one of my favourite things about sourcing furniture is actually going out and hunting down items rather then just seeing them on the Internet. Part of it is being there in the moment and experiencing that find, realising what something is. It’s not about necessarily seeing something and wanting it because it’s in front of you on the screen. For me, I love the thrill of the find having really looked for it. If I stumble across something great, I’m extremely happy!

What is the favourite piece you’ve sourced?

It was a Fase Boomerang 64 lamp. I bought it in Barcelona in this tiny little shop.  The guy took me upstairs and I saw it and thought, ‘Oh my’. These lamps were really on trend a few years ago because there was one on the desk from Mad Men.  I was lucky enough to find one in a colour that I’d never seen before.

What parts of being a furniture dealer do you most enjoy?

For me sourcing is the best part, going out and finding stuff. On Tuesday I left my house at 4:30am! I hadn’t been out shopping for the whole of Christmas so I was really eager. Sourcing something, finding something, and knowing a customer will receive this piece that you have found and be really pleased and blessed with it is a great feeling.

What do you think is going to be popular in the future?

Vintage Ikea catalogue, photo credit Gizmodo.

Early Ikea designs have already started trading hands for good money. Early Ikea is actually going to become quite sought after.  Ten years ago we had so many Victorian pieces and I wouldn’t be surprised if some of that came back because there’s a lot of quality. As we get further along in time pieces start to lack that quality of craftsmanship.

Which famous person’s home would you love to sneak peek into?

I would say the fashion designer Paul Smith. He is known to be an avid collector. I’ve seen pictures of his home with strange and peculiar objects which I find incredibly interesting.

Best way to spend weekend?

Columbia Road Flower Market. Primeur restaurant, go for the small plates. I’m a big fan and I’d eat there every day if I could afford to! For markets, go to Portobello for a day. It’s a really great atmosphere. It has made an interesting transition from the 50s – when it was quite a poor area – to becoming to one of the wealthiest parts of London but it still has a great atmosphere.

Portobello Road Market, photo credit Strawberry Tours

Browse all vintage lighting in the Objects of Interest 20c collection here.

A Design Classic: All You Need to Know About Ercol Furniture

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Luciano Randolfo Ercolani, Ercol’s founder was born in 1888 in a little country town in Italy. He moved to the East End of London with his parents some years later with the assistance of the Salvation Army. Whilst he was not a natural when it came to learning English he left school early to become a messenger boy whilst continuing to play in the Salvation Army Brass Band.

He would later apply to the Shoreditch Technical Institute to join a Furniture Design Course. He took drawing and design classes and then entered the City and Guilds exams in theory and construction of furniture.  Harry Parker from Frederick Parker furniture (later known as Parker-Knoll) offered Lucian the chance to work with them and this was the start of Lucien’s working life in High Wycombe. Lucien also became life long friends with Ted Gommes whose family were to become founders of G-plan in the 1950s. He worked with them until he set up his own company in 1920.

Lucien established his own furniture factory with the financial help of some local businessmen. It was first called Furniture Industries but is today known as Ercol. In 1932 a local chair making business known as Skulls fell in to financial difficulties and Lucien Ercolani took this over and it enabled him to expand his business. Even today, Ercol’s chairmaking section is known as Skulls.

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During the war the Ercol factory worked for the government making 25,000 tent pegs per day as well as munition boxes and other supplies. Both of Lucien’s sons Lucien B and Barry were prominent members of the RAF and Lucien B was shot down when returning from a raid in the English Channel. He managed to survive and was decorated for his service to the war.

In 1944 Lucien Ercolini accepted an offer from the Board of Trade to produce 100,000 low cost chairs. It took him 12 months to design and build machines to produce chairs quickly at a very low cost – their cost was 10s 6d for each chair. Lucien Ercolano realised that he could be a major part of post-war manufacturing. A month after the war ended the Britain Can Make it Festival was announced to be held at the V & A in London. He saw this as a wonderful opportunity to launch Ercols brand new range ‘The Windsor Collection’ which is something that we all associate with Ercol furniture today. Other designs would evolve later and many of them we still know and love today – such as the Loveseat (designed in 1956) and the Studio Couch. The stacking chair is also easily recognisable – these were produced in the thousands in the 1950s and 60’s and are still part of the Ercol Originals collection.

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After being one of the founding members of the Furniture Makers Guild in 1951, Lucian R Ercolani was made Master of the Guild in 1957 which became a city livery guild in 1963. He was followed in this position by his two sons and his grandson over the next 4 decades. His granddaughter, Vicky, is also a liveryman of the company.

In June 1964 Lucian R Ercolani was awarded an OBE for services to UK design and manufacturing. After 82 years in the old factory in High Wycombe, Ercol moved into a purpose built 16,000 square metre factory on the outskirts of Princes Risborough, Buckinghamshire. Designed by Horden Cherry Lee the building has won a number of awards for its architectural design and its environmental features.

Check out our Vintage Ercol selection on Vinterior

 

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5 Tips on How to Spot an Original Ercol Chair

It’s not everyday that you get to sit in a design classic – and that’s always the case when you’re relaxing in an Ercol chair. Whether it’s the iconic Ercol stacking chairs, the model 203 sofa and armchairs from the Windsor range or the high stick-back Ercol dining chairs, you’ll know that you’re in good hands. The […]

Where Retro and Modern Collide: Vintage Pieces in a Contemporary Home

Amy Bartlam Photography  Amy Bartlam Photography  Amy Bartlam Photography
Image source: Veneer Designs

Vintage is the new modern, or at least that’s how interior design trends stand right now. Blame it on the growing popularity of classic décor inspired by Great Gatsby, The Great Budapest Hotel, or Amélie, but retro glam is here to stay. Still, vintage finds should be carefully incorporated into a contemporary home to avoid a haphazardly put-together impression. However chic mix-and-match décors may be, there are a few principles you should bear in mind when enriching your home with finds belonging to different design eras. Here are five home styling tricks professional designers follow when introducing vintage elements into a modern home setting.

1. Contrasts for Vintage Eclecticism

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Photography by Janne Olander for Stadshem

Vintage elements in bold hues will infuse a minimalist home with a sense of visual opulence and eclecticism. As a general rule, most successful old-meets-new décor blends rely on the power of contrasts for aesthetic interest, which is why you should pay attention to the colors of vintage furnishings you’re introducing into your home. An antique statement piece in a bold tone will feature as a focal point in a color-coordinated room, and if you’re after superior effects, you can also draw on contrasts in terms of texture and shape when incorporating retro elements in your home.

2. Mix ‘n’ Match for Boho Aesthetics

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Image source: New Darlings

Using furniture pieces belonging to different periods of design history will create a boho chic backdrop in your nest. If you’re a firm believer in visual eclecticism, you can try to blend several styles in your living area rather than using just a few vintage pieces as accents. The mix-and-match formula will help create a décor that exudes personality, depth, and interest, allowing the vintage pieces to blend in neatly rather than commanding attention or overwhelming the rest of the décor. For eclectic traveler home aesthetics, you can round off the bohemian-style décor with ornaments and mementoes salvaged on your travels.

3. A Sophisticated Antique Statement

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Image sources: Hannah in the House and Skona Hem

However visually engaging, eclectic style is not everyone’s top favorite, but it doesn’t mean that you have to settle for a no-frills modern décor. A single vintage statement piece of furniture will be enough to add character and aesthetic value to your living area, but you should select it with care to prevent a brash décor impression. For instance, an antique leather sofa with a foot stool can double as the living room centerpiece, whereas a bold Victorian-esque wardrobe perched by glass-paneled aluminium sliding doors will add depth and contrast to a modern open-plan living area.

4. Thinking outside the Vintage Box

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Image source: Cup of Jo

When using vintage finds as décor accents, you don’t necessarily have to stick to conventions. A daring blend of retro and modern pieces such as a vintage desk topped by a modern ergonomic chair will unleash aesthetic dynamicity and add the element of visual surprise to the home office or living room. On that note, a mid-century chest of drawers will look at home as the TV console in a nature-inspired living room, while a retro bureau can be used as the home bar for a sense of playfulness and creativity.

5. Where Retro and Country Collide

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Image source: Decoist

Most vintage pieces come in solid wood with a matte paint coat, but if you wish to liven up the home atmosphere with a dose of rustic charm, you can overhaul antique pieces following in the country style footsteps. Wire-brushed wood cabinetry or tables with bold grain will seamlessly blend into the modern décor structured around pastel colours, stone and/or timber flooring, and organic textiles. For bonus aesthetic points, you can dress contemporary laminate floors with an antique rug, and round off the vintage décor with a few country-inspired extras such as a rustic coat hanger, decorative signboards, baskets, and a distressed table or floor lamp.

Introducing antique pieces into a contemporary-style living area will increase the aesthetic value of your home and infuse it with character and timeless elegance. There’s a host of ways in which you can pull off the old-meets-new décor, so feel free to experiment with different approaches – just don’t let your modern-looking living area go without retro touches.

Zoe Clark


Shop at Vinterior, Britain’s greatest selection of vintage, mid century, antique and design furniture & home decor. Shop from the best independent furniture boutiques on one platform.

Author bio:

Zoe Clark is a journalist, freelance stylist and blogger. She is a visual storyteller and aesthetician by heart who often writes about decorating and DIY ideas. She loves sparking creativity in people and giving them ideas for their own spaces. You can find her blogging at Smooth Decorator.

 

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