In the speed-up world that favours novelty over tradition, it can be tempting to try to decorate a house in one flawless sweep. In a desperate race for perfection and excellence, we often make hasty decisions based merely on the latest trends we’ve spotted on Pinterest and Instagram. And while those seamless decorating projects might bring instant dopamine hits, soon the initial excitement wears off and we end up craving for a change, realizing that the style we were so eager to pursue doesn’t actually resonate with our hearts.

Sounds familiar? If so, don’t lose sleep over it as this is a very common theme in a consumer society. Perfectly styled and beautifully shot, trend-driven interior images we absorb inevitably influence our design taste and easily trick the mind into adopting what seems beautiful over our authentic vision of a home. At the same time, cleverly designed marketing strategies offering cheap, disposable furniture promise to save us two invaluable resources – time and money. 

It’s no wonder why we often follow this beaten path!

Slow decorating: A sustainable alternative to the fast-paced culture | Vinterior

Image source: Skonahem

Slow decorating: A sustainable alternative to the fast-paced culture | Vinterior

Gilded Vintage Chandelier With Murano Glass, 1950s

However, there is a more sustainable alternative. As we see an increasing number of people taking a more considered approach to design, realising that nesting is indeed a laborious and self-exploring project, slow decorating becomes an appealing choice.

In an always-on culture of haste and multitasking, allowing a home to emerge over time becomes an act of protest. Slow decorating means taking baby steps that will eventually lead to mindful decisions about the way we use our personal space. It preaches the importance of an intentional interior decorating and crafting an authentic living space for us and our families that will serve us for a number of years, not just until the next interior buzz.

Slow decorating is not about a specific aesthetic. It’s about creating a meaningful relationship with a home.

Follow along to discover if slow home-crafting might be a sensible choice for you too.

Get to know the space and the way you use it

Slow decorating: A sustainable alternative to the fast-paced culture | Vinterior

Image source: revistaad

Unless some specific circumstances dictate otherwise, it is always smart to live in a space for a while before making any major decorating decisions. 

Our vision for the space doesn’t always match our lifestyle needs, so only once we get to occupy the actual architecture, learn how the light changes throughout the day and get familiar with the mood of each room, we can begin to realise what interventions we need to undertake to make the space truly work for us.

Slow decorating: A sustainable alternative to the fast-paced culture | Vinterior

Apple Botanical Poster Pull Down Map

Slow decorating: A sustainable alternative to the fast-paced culture | Vinterior

The 391 Ercol’s Kitchen Chair

Good things come to those who wait

Slow decorating: A sustainable alternative to the fast-paced culture | Vinterior

Image source: Architectural Digest

Learning to love an unfinished home requires a lot of patience and self-restraint. It is a humble act of acceptance that all valuable things take time to unfold and that the more care you invest in crafting your home, the better it will serve you.

But not everyone is willing to adapt to living in an undone space when they know they have the means to furnish it in one go. However, this approach is more prone to mistakes and at risk of ending up as a cookie-cutter look.

Slow decorating: A sustainable alternative to the fast-paced culture | Vinterior

Jean Cocteau Actress Original Lithograph 1956

Slow decorating: A sustainable alternative to the fast-paced culture | Vinterior

Norwegian Daybed By Harry Moen

Find your style

Slow decorating: A sustainable alternative to the fast-paced culture | Vinterior

Image source: Apartment Therapy

No matter how tempting it might be, don’t buy into trends. Be inspired, but not governed by them. They just won’t last and you will end up with a dated home you will be eager to update a season after season.

A slow approach to decorating encourages you to, over time, develop your personal style and make intentional choices that won’t as easily trigger the buyer’s remorse.

Good interior design is not just about aesthetics. It’s about wellbeing too, and it has a huge impact on our mood and health, and that’s the crucial reason why it is so important to make your home feel right for you and your family.

Slow decorating: A sustainable alternative to the fast-paced culture | Vinterior

French Solid Wood Shabby Chic Painted Table With Single Drawer, Blue Painted Table

Slow decorating: A sustainable alternative to the fast-paced culture | Vinterior

Vintage Marble Lamp French Table Lamp Art Nouveau

Slow decorating means more budget

Slow decorating: A sustainable alternative to the fast-paced culture | Vinterior

Image source: House Beautiful

Decorating an entire home can cost an arm and a leg and often leaves us compromising on the quality of non-essential items. But taking things slowly allows you to budget more effectively, while you prioritise only necessary work and leave the rest of the costs to spread across a longer period of time. Finishing touches can always come later on when we get a good grasp on the direction we’re after.

Invest in a long-lasting, high-quality design that will serve you for decades. It might cost a bit extra up front but won’t fail you as quickly as its cheap alternatives.

Slow decorating: A sustainable alternative to the fast-paced culture | Vinterior

Stunning Set 12 Vintage Danish Teak Dining Chairs 1960’s

Slow decorating: A sustainable alternative to the fast-paced culture | Vinterior

Art Nouveau Oak Small Round / Center Table

Slow decorating: A sustainable alternative to the fast-paced culture | Vinterior

Vase

Be mindful about the materials you introduce to your home

Slow decorating: A sustainable alternative to the fast-paced culture | Vinterior

Image source: Dwell

Opt for honest materials that age well and let their patina tell its stories. Rather than striving for a polished look, introduce a few worn items into your home collection to make it feel more relaxed and layered.

Whenever possible, try to select sustainable materials such as bamboo, clay, wool, hemp or organic cotton. But don’t shy away from the recycled plastic either. 

Slow decorating: A sustainable alternative to the fast-paced culture | Vinterior

Vintage Retro Danish Teak Writing Office Desk By Drylund Of Denmark

Slow decorating: A sustainable alternative to the fast-paced culture | Vinterior

1960’S Table Lamp By Josef Hurka

Slow decorating: A sustainable alternative to the fast-paced culture | Vinterior

Antique Turkish Megri Prayer Rug, Rare Yellow Ground, Mid 19 Th Century

Fight the urge for perfection

Aim for the collected, not the perfected look. Let the final edit show what you love and cherish the most. Heirloom pieces, vintage finds, travel souvenirs and personal memorabilia will create a true reflection of the unique personas that inhabit the space. Honest, authentic interiors are always the most appealing.

Choose vintage, reuse, repurpose

Slow decorating: A sustainable alternative to the fast-paced culture | Vinterior

Image source: House and Garden

Rather than discarding them as trash, look for ways to reuse the objects you no longer need. Adopt vintage furniture from others, but also think of passing it on if you find that it no longer serves you.

You can always donate or swap, but you can also sell it on the Vinterior Marketplace.

Slow decorating: A sustainable alternative to the fast-paced culture | Vinterior

Stunning Antique Decorative Gilt Gesso Ornate Frame

Slow decorating: A sustainable alternative to the fast-paced culture.

Daybed French Antique Late 19th Century Louis Xv Revival Sofa Use Or Recover

Slow decorating: A sustainable alternative to the fast-paced culture | Vinterior

Antique Grandfather Clock Mahogany Maple And Co Circa 1890

A soulful home cannot be bought. It has to be created. And creating a layered home, bursting with personality requires time and thought.